NEWS & BLOG

wild life drawing

Wild Life Drawing

Having successfully organised a lot of life drawing events over the years, you could say that we’re invested in it’s progression as a product. So what’s the newest life drawing concept on the market at the moment? Wild life drawing! If you haven’t heard of it, you’re missing out! Fortunately, we’re excited to tell you about it!

 

What is it?

wild life drawing
Spencer Wilton

Wild life drawing uses animals for models instead of humans so expect dogs, donkeys, wolves, owls, lizards and more. With fewer Londoners being able to have pets, and with the city developing quickly, it’s not often that they get to be around animals and wildlife, and the ‘out of sight, out of mind’ element can be true. Wild Life Drawing provides a relaxed, creative space to learn more about wildlife and animal welfare issues.

 

How did it Start?

wild life drawing animal
Sam Bush

Jennie Webber, artist and animal activist created Wild Life Drawing in 2014, prompted by her concern of the increasing disconnect between people and wildlife. Jennie believes that drawing allows the artist to see the finer details, encouraging people to ask questions about animals, learning about their species and their habitat. Her collaborations with Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, Farms Not Factories, RSPB and more, bring animal welfare into light in a fun, engaging and creative way.

 

Why it’s so Wonderful

wild life drawing animal
Spencer Wilton

For every class, a proportion of the ticket sales goes to animals so that more  can be rescued and taken care of. It also benefits people, offering them the rare opportunity to have a direct relationship to wildlife and encourages them to ask questions. Curiosity can only further benefit the animals, as many artists choose to donate to animal charities during the class and consider conservation of wildlife and animal welfare issues more in future. You can find all of the information to try a class yourself here.

 

If you’d like to hear more about what the world is doing to conserve wildlife and the possible future of wildlife friendly London, see our Linkedin article about green architecture.

Header image: Spencer Wilton